Experiencing Great Architecture and Creative Built Environments

Posts tagged “Art Deco

Guardian Building (1928)

Wirt C. Rowland, Architect

500 Griswold Detroit MI

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

While on my road trips I have my cameras with me at all times to capture the buildings I have made the pilgrimage to experience. While home in Detroit, I go past some of America’s great architectural treasures nearly every day. I have been in each of them countless times over the years and almost take them for granted. I do take visitors through them to show them off, but rarely do I think to bring my own camera.

Yesterday I was downtown and walked into the Guardian Building to be inspired. Of course my “big” camera was back home, but I took out my phone and tried to capture the experience with the camera in my phone. Consider these as just snapshots of this amazing colorful “Art Deco Mayan Revival” space. Hopefully this will be enough to tempt you to experience this for yourself the next time you are in Detroit. It is well worth the trip.

Check back for my description and comments on the building, but in the mean time enjoy the photographs.

Click here to view the Guardian Building’s website

Advertisements

Cincinnati Union Terminal (1933)

Paul Philippe Cret with Fellheimer & Wagner, Architects

1301 Western Ave., Cincinnati OH

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Last Visited March 19 2012

Visible from I-75, you may think this building is the Hall of Justice from the DC Comic’s Justice League – which it did inspire. An image of this building also appeared in the movie Batman Forever as the “Hippodrome”, where Dick Grayson’s family is killed by Two-face.

In reality, it is the Cincinnati Union Terminal for train service in Cincinnati. Designed by Paul Cret, the same beaux arts architect as the Detroit Institute of Arts.

The Art Deco facade has bas relief sculptures flanking a huge arched window assembly with a stepped fountain out in front greeting travelers.

Inside, the halfdome lobby is vast and surprisingly colorful, with bold stripes of yellows and oranges in the ceiling, and amazing colored glass mosaic murals, each 22 feet high and 110 feet long depicting the history of Cincinnati.  From the lobby floor you at first do not realize they are composed of thousands of small glass mosaic pieces, but once you realize that, there are all the more impressive.


Carew Tower (1930)

Walter W. Ahlschlager, Architect

W. Fifth Street and Fountain Square, Cincinnati OH

Aerial View and Directions

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Last visited March 19 2012

This 49 story Art Deco/Art Moderne office tower is part of the complex that includes the Netherland Plaza Hotel. Be sure to explore the street level shopping lobby to see the silver leaf ceiling and the colorful Rookwood pottery tile archway surrounds with a bold floral theme.


Netherland Plaza Hotel (1931)

Walter W. Ahlschlager, Architect

35 West Fifth Street, Cincinnati OH

Aerial View and Directions

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Last Visited March 18-19, 2012

The Historic Netherland Plaza Hotel Building opened it’s doors on January 28, 1931 to rave reviews. The 800 room Art Deco hotel has one of the most beautiful hotel lobby restaurant/bars anywhere, the Palm Court. Built as part of the Carew Tower Complex, this hotel has hosted the likes of Winston Churchill, Elvis, Eleanor Roosevelt, Bing Crosby and John and Jackie Kennedy. Make sure you stop by the consierge station and pick up the “Walking Tour & Pocket History” brochure. Take the meandering path leading up through the Palm Court, Apollo Gallery, Continental Room, Hall of Mirrors, the Julep Room, Pavillion Caprice and the Hall of Nations. Grand staircases, each different, make the “climb” from street level up to the fourth floor Pavillion Caprice a most pleasurable journey. The Pavillion Caprice hosted 16 year old Doris Day’s first professional appearance. Even the coat check room off the lobby has the most interesting art deco door surround.

This is the first building that has a post on all 3 of my blogs, check out the Hotel and Restaurant posts for additional photos of this grand old dame.


Boston Avenue Church (1929)

Bruce Goff of Rush Endacott and Rush, Architects

Adah Robinson, Designer

1301 South Boston Avenue, Tulsa, OK

Aerial View and Map

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

From my Archives – Photos taken October 16 2004, last visited November 14 2008

This National Historic Landmark is considered one the finest examples of  Art Deco architecture in the country. There seems to be some controvery about who should be credited with designing the church, Adah Robinson, Bruce Goff’s high school art teacher, or Bruce Goff himself, an architect who became principal in the architectural firm responsible for the building.

A great glorius Art Deco masterpiece, this church and tower has bold forms and decoration. They appear in some parts as minimal sculptural forms, and in other areas applied elaborate decoration.

The Church can be toured when the building is open during regular hours and is well worth a stop.

Church Website Building History Page

Tulsa Preservation Commission web page on the Church

I am taking the time to go through my archives and posting some of the buildings I have visited prior starting this blog. While some of the photographs are taken with early low-resolution digital cameras, hopefully they capture the general feeling of the buildings…prompting a visit of your own.