Experiencing Great Architecture and Creative Built Environments

Posts tagged “AIA Gold Medal

Fort Wayne Fine Arts Center (1973)

Louis I. Kahn Architect

Now the Arts United Center, 303 E. Main Street Fort Wayne IN

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Visited October 27 2013

Designed in 1961-64

Architect Louis I. Kahn designed a theater in Fort Wayne Indiana…who knew?

Famous for the Salk Institute in La Jolla, the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, and the Parliament of Bangladesh in Dhaka, he actually built relatively few buildings so Fort Wayne is in excellent company. He was well known as the design critic at Yale School of Architecture and as Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. He received the AIA’s Gold Medal.

The exterior of the building is a crisp, simple box constructed of dark brick.  The front facade has two very shallow arched keyhole windows linked with a concrete form acting as a heavy lintel over the entry doors.

The theater in Fort Wayne will require another trip, as it was closed on a late sunday afternoon. Kahn’s interiors are known for their “poetic sensibilities” and a walk through the lobby and auditorium I am sure will be inspirational.

The Art Institute of Chicago’s  Architecture in Context  –  Louis Kahn in the Midwest issue focusing on the Fort Wayne Theater.

Link to the Arts United Center website


Palmer House – Interiors (1950)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

227 Orchard Hills Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Aerial View and Directions

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Visited September 15-16, 2012

See my post “Palmer House – Exterior” for information on the property.

The interior dramatically changes personality as the light changes in the space. From morning light, afternoon light, evening light and then artificial light the spaces are transformed as time goes by. When the trees, lawn and natural gardens are in sunlight, the interiors takes a back seat as the windows and walls seemingly disappear and the beautiful natural hillside is the star. In the evening after the sun sets, the glass appears as black panels focusing attention inward to the interior. The integrated indirect lighting transforms the oil-finished cypress clad ceiling of the living room into a warm canopy focusing on the fireplace. The polished Cherokee red concrete floors subtly reflect the light from above. Wright’s Origami Chairs ( which are quite comfortable ) are placed around the living room focused on the fireplace. Built into a wall by the kitchen is the dining table surrounded by dining chairs ( which are not comfortable).

All of the interior walls come together at 60 or 120 degree angles, as the floor plan is organized on an equilateral triangle grid. This grid is implemented in the furniture as well, even the beds have 60 and 120 degree corners.


Palmer House – Exterior (1950) – revisited

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

227 Orchard Hills Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Aerial View and Directions

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Visited September 15-16, 2012

Look at my first Palmer House post from two years ago for a description of the building.

The Palmer House has been purchased from the Palmer family estate, and is now available for overnight rentals (when the new owner is not in town). The purchase agreement comes with a very strict preservation agreement. Since it was purchased from the original owner’s estate, and the preservation agreement is in effect, this is an incredible opportunity to “live” in an original Frank Lloyd Wright house. The experience is pure Wright, without any unfortunate “updates” that mar many Wright properties that have gone through multiple ownership changes over the years.

Although recuperating from a back injury and not prepared with my tripod, I could not pass up an invitation from some amazing friends to spend the night. I have documented the house in 3 separate posts showing the exterior, the interior and the tea house on the property.


Palmer House – Tea House (1964)

John Howe, Architect

227 Orchard Hills Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Aerial View and Directions

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Visited September 15-16, 2012

After visiting Japan, the Palmer’s planned a teahouse on their property sited down the hill from the main house. John Howe, the on-site Taliesin representative during construction of the main house, was the architect (Wright had passed away 5 years earlier).

The tea house uses the same materials and equilateral triangle grid as the main house. It includes a recessed sitting area and table for tea drinking, a fireplace, bed, and small kitchen and bathroom.


Irwin Union Bank (1954)

Eero Saarinen Architect

500 Washington Street Columbus IN

Aerial View and Directions

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Photographs taken March 16 2012

As luck would have it ( although I say this with a sad heart ) the day I visited the Irwin Union Bank and walked in the front door…was the last day that this building was open to the public. At least as a bank. All of the employees were packing up their desks, and carting off their belongings. I was able to take lots of interior photographs, probably the last opportunity in a long time. I asked several of the bank employees what they were going to do with the building. They all hedged a little, and I got the feeling they have been asked that question a hundred times and were uncomfortable because they did not have an answer. The consensus was that it may become a museum sometime in the future…a hopeful result but an unconvincing delivery.

Even if it does open as a “museum” it will not have the same feeling as being what it was designed as…a bank. When I was there, even on the last day, people were coming in and cashing their checks, and doing their banking, just as they did the first day the bank opened in 1954.

The building is an interesting low glass box with a thin white roof plane. The roof plane has 9 domes projecting out above the roof in a 3×3 grid. These domes are actually the light fixtures for the bank interior – reflectors for the suspended uplights flooding the bank with warm light. The only walls that go to the ceiling are the perimeter glass walls. The interior “walls” stop short of the ceiling. They actually look like part of the file cabinet system, with the conference room/private offices enclosed with the cabinets.  This keeps the overall ceiling plane pure and uninterrupted.

Still worth a visit….the exterior walls are all glass so you can still peek in.


First Christian Church (1943)

Eliel Saarinen Architect

531 Fifth Street, Columbus IN

Aerial View and Directions

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Photographs taken March 15 & 16 2012

For those familiar with the Cranbrook Educational Community in Bloomfield Hills, MI, elements of this building should feel “familiar”. Eliel Saarinen the architect lived at Cranbrook. He designed many buildings at Cranbrook with similar brick detailing, and interesting asymetrical placements. The First Christian Church shows an interesting mix of contemporary, Art & Crafts and  even a feeling of the old cloister and gothic places of worship skillfully integrated. His wife Loja, an acomplished textile artist, created the tapestry “Sermon on the Mount” hanging on the side wall of the alter. And keeping it in the family, the hanging light fixtures were designed by his son Eero, who also designed the St. Louis Arch, the TWA terminal at JFK, and the North Christian Church in Columbus Indiana.


Cleo Rogers Memorial Library (1969)

I.M. Pei, Architect

536 Fifth Street, Columbus IN 47201

Aerial View and Directions

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Photos taken March 16, 2012

It is not every midwestern city of 45,000 that has a public library designed by I. M. Pei, and this one has a Henry Moore sculpture placed out front to boot. The citizens should feel lucky to have such a pair right downtown.


North Christian Church – Interior (1964)

Eero Saarinen, Architect

850 Tipton Lane, Columbus IN

Aerial View and Directions

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Photographs taken March 16, 2012

The interior of this landmark church is as exceptional as the exterior.

It is intimate, simple, focused…

Inspirational.

Click here for photos and description of the exterior.


North Christian Church – Exterior (1964)

Eero Saarinen, Architect

Daniel Kiley, Landscape Architect

850 Tipton Lane, Columbus IN

Aerial Photos and Directions

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Photographs taken March 16, 2012

This is one of my favorite buildings. I have visited this building 4 times, and each time I am more impressed with it’s “complex simplicity” (this term is borrowed from a business associate who summarized my rambling passionate description of the building concisely).

Saarinen’s path he creates for the faithful (and tourist alike) is a sequence of carefully and subtly planned discoveries. Starting with Dan Kiley’s landscaping, each parking area is separated with rows of hedges just high enough to screen the cars, but the hovering hexagonal church is visible just above the hedges. The procession takes you through the only opening in the hedges on axis with the church’s  exceptionally tall and slender steeple and main entrance. Past the last row of parking spaces, there is a stairway taking you up through the center of a bank of flowers approaching the church. Here you see that the hexagonal structure is centered in a recess in the ground, raised on a bunker-like base with a landscaped bank surrounding the church. You then drop down a series of low and very deep steps, “ducking” below the low metal eave, revealing the tall glass windows tucked up in the shadows of the steeply sloping soffit. The series of glass entry doors open up the glass perimeter wall allowing entry to the interior. See the next post for photos of the interior of this landmark church.

The hexagonal form is stretched in the east/west direction creating a bit of dynamism, but maintains it’s pure simple presense, floating slightly above the earth, and pointing directly to the heavens.


Lykes Residence (1959-66)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

6636 N. 36th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85018

Aerial View and Directions

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“Wright’s last residential design to be built by the original client” – as identified in William Allin Storrer’s book The Architecture of Frank LLoyd Wright A Complete Catalog.

The design was sketched by Wright before his death in 1959, and Taliesin Fellow John Rattenbury supervised construction, which didn’t commence until 1966.

This pink block building gracefully arcs on the desert hillside above Phoenix. Clearly visible from the road, you can appreciate the mature work of Wright by taking a short roadtrip up 36th street from the city.

There are several Wright houses in the Phoenix area, but most are not very visible from the street. You can see the gate and part of the roof of the Harold Price Sr. house (1954) at 7211 Tatum. The David Wright House (1950) at 3212 E. Exeter had recently been purchased at the time of my visit, and was under renovation with a construction fence around the property. The Adelman Residence (1951) at 5802 N. 30th Street, is visible across a very large front lawn, but what I was able to see was not of great note (in my opinion). Next door is the Boomer Residence (1953) at 5808 N. 30th Street. Through the densely wooded yard you can just make out the roof from the street. The Carlson House (1950) at 1123 W. Palo Verde Dr. is a white paneled house with bright blue trim behind a block wall and blue metal fence. The carport is visible from the road, but the most prominent feature on site at the time of my visit was a classic red convertible.

After the roadtrip hunting down the Wright houses, even if just to catch a glimpse, I recommend a drink and dinner at Wright’s at the Biltmore, a fine food restaurant in the Arizona Biltmore (1927). See Traverse360 Restaurants for a description.


Taliesin West (1937)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

12621 N. Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd., Scottsdale, AZ 95261

Aerial View and Directions

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From the archives, Visited September 24, 2009

This is a “must see” destination for all Architecture Tourists – Frank Lloyd Wright’s own winter home and studio in Scottsdale AZ at the foot of the McDowell Mountains in the Arizona desert. Visiting you really can sense that it feels more like a camp than a permanent complex of buildings. As you would expect from Wright’s best buildings, the building is -as he would put it-  “of the site”, not on the site. With the inclusion of the native american petroglyphs at the entrance, and the native materials used in the “Desert Masonry” walls, it feels as though it has been there forever – and I hope it remains there for many more generations to experience in person. Photos do not capture that sense of place and discovery that you experience walking through in person (and I have seen hundreds if not thousands of photos of Taliesin West over the many years). Taliesin West houses the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation and still teaches architecture to its “apprentices” at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.

There are many types of tours available for Architectural Tourists. Check out the Taliesin West Tour Webpage for details.

I took the 3-hour Behind the Scenes Tour, but there are also less expensive 1-hour tours, 90 minute tours, and Night Light tours. Take your pick and I am sure you will not leave disapointed with any of them.

Not only is Taliesin West worth the trip to tour the complex, it also has a great bookstore and gift shop. The Frank Lloyd Wright Archives are also housed there for scholars and researchers to study the principles of Wright’s work. Checkout the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Website for details.

This is truly a working/living facility, not a mothballed museum behind plexiglas – come and experience it for yourself!

After exploring Taliesin West, I recommend you stay on theme and head to the Arizona Biltmore and relax over a drink and dinner at Wright’s at the Biltmore, a Traverse360Restaurant recommendation.


Gammage Memorial Auditorium (1959)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

Arizona State University

Apache Blvd. at Mill Ave. , Tempe AZ 85281

Aerial View and Map

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From the archives, visited September 27, 2009

This building was never a favorite of mine while studying Wright’s architecture in college. I was in Phoenix to visit Taliesin West, and while there I located and visited all of Wright’s buildings in the area. This building surprised me, and I left liking it. In person, there are interesting perspectives and almost frivolous details in the copper colored arches cascading down the ramps holding the simple white globe lights in copper colored rings. The pink lollypop colonnade still perplexes me, but the brick rotunda in the rear with its row of shallow arches (reminiscent of Saarinen’s chapel at MIT) was strong and well worth the stop.

A Place to Stay:

On this trip I stayed at the aLoft in Tempe. Convenient with a cool vibe. Check it out on Traverse360 Hotels.


Smith House (1946)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

5045 Pon Valley Road, Bloomfield Hills, MI

Aerial View and Map

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Photos taken January 7, 2012

The Smith House is a great example of Wright’s Usonian Houses. It is a more refined version of the first Jacobs House in Madison. Situated in the upscale Detroit suburb of Bloomfield Hills, this rather modest house is surrounded by huge mansions of the more traditional style.

The low, horizontal composition hugs the earth and extends across the site with the brick garden walls. The owner’s large scale sculpture collection still graces the grounds and provides a nice visual break from the otherwise austentatious bigger than big neighbors.

This house is visible from the street, with a complete view of the front and north side facades across the lawn. The Smith House gives you a clear view of a pristine example his Usonian House concept. Well worth the trip if you are in the area. It is just down the street from the Cranbrook Educational Community with it’s original Saarinen designed campus, and close by is Wright’s Affleck House.


UNM School of Architecture and Planning (2007)

Antoine Predock FAIA, Architect

University of New Mexico George Pearl Hall

1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131

Aerial View and Map

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From my Archives, Photos taken December 13, 2008

Antoine Predock has delivered a strikingly modern building which acts as the gateway to the otherwise “ubiquitous Pueblo Revival architecture” of the University of New Mexico campus. The facility fronts Central Avenue which was part of the historic Route 66 through Albuquerque. The building provides a variety of gathering spaces, both interior and exterior for lectures, project crituques, studying and …..skateboarders. The white wall slab projecting out of the west facade over the entrance is used as a screen to project videos on after dark.

Architect’s Web Page featuring Building

Architect Magazine Story


Price Tower (1952)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

510 Dewey Avenue, Bartlesville, OK 74003

Aerial View and Map

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From my archives, Photos from October 17 and 19th, 2004; and November 16, 2008

One of my favorite buildings, anywhere, anytime, by any architect.

I have visited the Price Tower 3 times, and it has never disappointed, in fact each time I visit I see something new and appreciate it more.

Originally the Tower was conceived as a mixed use “skyscraper” for the Price Company, with offices, apartments and retail space. It still functions as a mixed-use tower, but with some different uses.  It is currently houses a gallery, gift shop and arts center on the first and second floors, offices and a boutique hotel in the tower, and a restaurant and bar near the top. Mr. Price’s office on the top floor ( and the rest of the building infact ) is a museum open to the public for tours.

The reinforced concrete structure of the building is concentrated in the core area of the building, with the floor plates cantilevered out from the building’s core. Wright compares the structure of the tower to that of a tree, and calls the tower “the tree that escaped the crowded forest”. There is a tap root foundation, the building core or trunk rises up and the floors are cantilevered out like the branches of a tree. The curtainwall system is applied to the edge of the floor slabs with a series of horizontal and vertical copper sunscreens providing both shade, and a complex facade design which makes each side of the building appear unique.

To appreciate how exceptional and complex this building is, you should study the floor plans. The integration of the various uses in really small floor plates is complex. The apartments are two story spaces, with the second floor angled across as a mezzanine overlooking the living area. This not only provides a dramatic two story space for the living room, but also creates an intimate exterior balcony for the bedroom as the angled mezzanine continues beyond the curtainwall in the corner. Private offices are located in the other 3 quadrants of the tower floors.

The design and construction of the building is documented in a book by Frank Lloyd Wright called “The Story of the Tower” (Horizon Press 1956). If you can get a copy of this book, you will be able to understand the design through drawings, construction photographs, and Wright’s own words describing his intentions with the design.

The last two times I visited, the Inn at Price Tower was open and I was able to stay over night in the tower. I highly recommend it. The two story apartments are available as suites, with some of the offices converted into guest rooms as well. There is nothing like spending a few days in the building. You can go on the tour, see what exhibit is in the gallery, have a drink and dinner in the 15th floor Copper Bar, and watch the sunset over the Oklahoma plains through the two story windows in the living room of your apartment hotel suite.

The Price Tower Arts Center


BOK Center (2008)

Cesar Pelli, Architect

200 South Denver, Tulsa, OK

Aerial Photo and Map

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From  my archives, visited November 15, 2008

This bold, curving form clad in stainless steel panels and glass is an eyecatcher in downtown Tulsa.

Billed as “an iconic  marvel that blends Art Deco and  American Indian styles”, this 19,100 seat arena was designed by famed architect Cesar Pelli. He said the building would “pay tribute to downtown’s art deco history by taking an optimistic form; the Arkansas River by having a flowing feeling; and the city’s American Indian history by its use of circles.” I’ll let you be the judge of the inspiration, but the building does provide an iconic form that is memorable  – which was the desired by the design review committee.

I am taking the time to go through my archives and posting some of the buildings I have visited prior starting this blog. While some of the photographs are taken with early low-resolution digital cameras, hopefully they capture the general feeling of the buildings…prompting a visit of your own.


Richard Lloyd Jones House “Westhope” (1929)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

Richard Lloyd Jones House

3700 South Birmingham Avenue, Tulsa, OK

Aerial View and Map

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From my Archives, Photos taken October 19, 2004 and November 14, 2008

I am taking the time to go through my archives and posting some of the buildings I have visited prior starting this blog. While some of the photographs are taken with early low-resolution digital cameras, hopefully they capture the general feeling of the buildings…prompting a visit of your own.

This Frank Lloyd Wright house I always thought was a little odd based on the published photos and floor plans in the multiple books surveying Wright’s work. It is a large house (over 10,000 sq. ft.) and wraps around a courtyard with a swimming pool. Built on a corner lot, the house it very visible from the street on two sides. Richard Lloud Jones was Frank Lloyd Wright’s cousin and publisher of the Tulsa Tribune.

The scale of the house  is very deceptive due to the block and window configuration. There is no clear reference for height and floor separation. The photos published in the book  “In the Nature of Materials” ( by Hitchcock 1942, images 297-302 ) were my main reference prior to my visit. The black and white photos taken just after construction (prior to any landscaping) show a stark, brutalist, severe composition. In reality, the house is warm,  interesting, and with the mature landscaping actually fits into the traditional neighborhood better than expected.

As has happened frequently while walking around photographing Frank Lloyd Wright buildings, an occasional neighbor will come out and start sharing their antidotes and experiences with Wright. In this case, an elderly neighbor followed me around and told me that when the house was built there were no trees at all on the lot (as can be confirmed in the Hitchcock book). He said that Wright stood on the porch of the house and had a sack of potatoes. He  took a handfull of potatoes and tossed them into the front yard and told the owner to plant tress where the potatoes landed. The mature trees in the front yard he told me as he pointed to each of them one by one, were planted exactly where the pototoes landed. Wright seems to attract all sorts of stories that are repeated at many of his buildings. Most of them relate to leaking roofs, this was the first time I heard one relating to potatoes.

The blocks form piers, with the glass set back from the face of the block. You can see “through” the house to the courtyard beyond in many cases. The house really feels like an arrangement of piers with a roof,  rather than a wall with windows. The all glass compositions at the ends of the wings (referenced as aviaries in one plan I recall) add a lightness to the otherwise heavy, closely spaced piers.

Tulsa Preservation Commission Webpage on House


Affleck House (1941)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

1925 Woodward Avenue, Bloomfield Hills, MI

Aerial View and Map

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Photos taken October 29, 2011

The Gregor and Elizabeth Affleck House is a great early example of Wright’s Usonian Houses. A model of the house was displayed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York before it was constructed. It is in very good condition after several restoration projects undertaken by The Friends of the Affleck House and Lawrence Technological Univeristy’s School of Architecture which owns the structure.

I have been to the house many times since my college days. I was in the area late saturday afternoon and thought I would stop by and snap a few photos. The recent Chrysler commercial which features the house must have been in the back of my mind as I drove down Woodward Avenue.  If you respect the owner’s of the adjacent houses, you can easily view the house from all sides from the drive that loops the house. I will go back after all the leaves are off the trees to get some additional photos featuring the cantilevered living room and deck. The University does provide tours of the house (see attached links). I thought it was interesting that I found a 1948 Oldsmobile TV commercial online that featured the house as well (see attached link to view). Look for a post of the nearby Smith House by Frank Lloyd Wright in the coming days. I stopped there following my visit to the Affleck House.

1948 Futuramic Oldsmobile TV Advertisement featuring the Affleck House

LTU’s Web Page of House

Tour Brochure

Exhibit Catalog– which contains copies of some of Wright’s drawings for the house and early B&W photos of the house and interiors


People’s Federal Savings and Loan Association (1917)

Louis Sullivan, Architect

101 East Court Street

Sidney, OH

Aerial View and Map

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Last Visited August 29, 2011

Well worth the short drive off I-75, this is probably the nicest brick box you will ever see. Beautifully detailed with ornate terracotta trim, stained glass windows, and bold colored mosaic tile “Thrift” mural over the main entry, this is one of Louis Sullivan’s great small masterpieces. Situated on the corner of the midwestern town square across from the county courthouse, it documents what small town America was like 100 years ago. It is meticulously maintained and is pristine for it’s age. The building still houses the People’s Federal Savings and Loan Association, and is open to the public during regular business hours.

http://www.peoplesfederalsandl.com/


Engineering Research Center (1995)

Michael Graves, Architect

University of Cincinnati Campus

Aerial View and Directions

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Last Visited August 28, 2011

The Engineering Research Center is another good Graves building. It if full of his earthy colors and chunky columns and simple building block shapes. The long building facade is broken up into a series of seemingly individual pavillions all in a row. The main section is twice as wide as the others and is more  formal looking with the tall colonnade at the entry level and two rows of short fat columns at the top. This wide pavillion is flanked by several tall narrower pavillions, two on the south side and one on the north side. These boxy bodies with barrel vaulted shoulders, and blocky heads look like old school robots with party hats. Not my favorite Graves Building, but it has a strong presence on campus and is interesting. Next trip I hope I have than just a few minutes and I can walk all the way around and get inside and explore it more.


Vontz Center for Molecular Studies (1999)

Frank Gehry, Architect

University of Cncinnati

3125 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati OH 45267

Aerial View and Map

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Visited August 27, 2011

Gehry’s first “all brick” building stands as a sculpture on the University of Cincinnati’s campus. It is an interesting assembly of  forms with windows applied in various shapes floating or rotated out from the brick skin. From a fountain and lawn on the west side of the building, there is a grand brick stair as wide as the facade leading up to the building. At the top of the stairway, where you would expect a grand entrance,  is a brick wall with a wide window above the top landing with no door. You have to contunue around the building wing to get to a doorway. The grand stairway forms more of a pedestal for a sculpture, not a grand entry for a building. It is an interseting work of art.

Vontz Center Webpage


Peter B. Lewis Building (2002)

Frank Gehry, Architect

11119 Bellflower Road, Cleveland, OH 44106

On the Case Western Reserve University Campus

Map and Aerial View

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Visited June 1, 2011

Home of the Weatherhead School of Management


Feiman House (1954)

Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect

452 Santa Clara Dr., NW, Canton, OH 44709

Map and Aerial View

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Visited June 1, 2011

The north side of this inline plan Usonian house is very visible from the public street. The low slung flat roofed house and carport hug the site with a raised flat roof over the living room with unusually tall clerestory windows. The clerestory windows do not have the decorative plywood screens, but the low band of windows have the unique decorative plywood screens covering them. The brick wall extension shielding the private yard from the street also has an open abstract design in the brickwork.

Unfortunately, the brickwork has undergone extensive reworking or repointing with mortar that does not match the original mortar. These patches are obvious and are all over the wall and carport piers, but I guess the alternate of a crumbling wall and carport would have been much less desirable.

This is the 145th Frank Lloyd Wright Building I have visited (but who is counting…?).

A block away is Wright’s  Rubin House (1953). This house is not sufficiently visible from the street to warrant drive-by if you are looking for photos, at least in the summer with the heavily wooded lot fully “leafed out”.  (The 146th FLLW Building I have visited).

A little over a mile away is Wright’s Dobkins House (1953). This house, althought set back quite a distance from the road, is visible from the street if you look over the wide expanse of well manicured lawn between the trees. (The 147th FLLW Building I have visited).


Humana Building (1985)

Michael Graves, Architect

500 West Main Street, Louisville, KY 40202

Map and Aerial View

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(Last visited 03/20/2011, all photos taken 03/20/2011)

Paul Goldberger Review in The New York Times

Michael Graves & Associates Project Link