Experiencing Great Architecture and Creative Built Environments

-TN-Nashville

Bow House and Neighborhood (2009)

Ryan Thewes Architect (of the Bow House)

249 33rd Ave. N, Nashville, TN

Aerial View and Directions

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Visited March 17 2012

On the side of a hill overlooking the freeway and Centennial Park, with the Nashville Skyline in the distance, is a cluster of new contemporary houses. Before my trip to Nashville I did some searching for interesting architecture to visit while there. I came upon the “Bow House” by architect Ryan Thewes. It was named for the bow trusses which form the dramatic roof structure. In locating the house I found that it was part of a small group of similar homes at the end of a rather traditional neighborhood. I do not know who the other architects are, but there is an interesting variety of “Dwell” like houses in this enclave.


Nashville’s Germantown Neighborhood

Just north of the State Capitol Building and the Bicentennial  State Park

Nashville, TN

Aerial View and Directions

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I happened upon this neighborhood when going out to dinner with friends at the Mad Platter Restaurant. It is a great mixture of  buildings from as early as the 1830’s to the present. There are workers cottages with the  “Shotgun” floor plans typical of this building type. The restaurant we had dinner in is an approx. 1890’s commercial storefront building. Across 6th street is a fish market, and across Monroe is a line of wood framed worker’s cottages from about 1870’s. This is not only a historic district with meticulously maintained small houses, there is also a building boom going on.  There are new brick townhouses and loft condo developments, bringing some new energy to the neighborhood – and continuing  its lineage with buildings from many different decades. It reminds me of  Detroit’s Corktown neighborhood.


The Parthenon – Nashville (1925-31)

William B. Dinsmoor, Russell E. Hart, Architects

Centenial Park, Nashville TN

Aerial View and Directions

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Visited March 17 2012

First built for the Tennessee Centennial Exposition of 1897, the Nashville Parthenon is an “full scale replica” of the original in Athens. The building was originally built as a temporary structure, but the building was so popular that it remained after the Exposition was over. The plaster, wood and brick temporary structure did not weather well as you would expect, and in 1920 construction of this more permanent concrete structure began.

Billed as an “replica” of the Athens original is in reference to the dimensions of the building, not the building materials. This version is cast in concrete, rather than the original marble version in Greece.